Celmatix awarded $4.5M to expand in NYS

Celmatix, a next-generation women’s health company, has been awarded $4.5 million from Empire State Development’s New York City Regional Economic Development Council (REDC), to expand its headquarters in Manhattan.

Piraye Yurttas Beim, PhD, Founder and CEO of Celmatix stated “New York State has been there for Celmatix every step of the way as we’ve transitioned from ambitious startup to innovative next generation women’s health company. From the training I received through New York State’s Center for Biotechnology program at Stony Brook University, to the support we received from the Empire State Development START-UP New York program when it was time to build our first lab, and now, with this award as we prepare to take the next step in the evolution of our company, we are honored to have continued support to grow and thrive in New York.”

Additional Articles: pharmiweb

Entrepreneurship Training Program from NIH & CDC: I-Corps

Funding Opportunity Now Available for 2018 Summer Cohort of I-Corps at NIH

Did you know that the NIH and CDC offer entrepreneurship training program for small businesses?

I-Corps at NIH is an experience-based program designed specifically for small biotech businesses. Through this 8-week program, you will learn how to build a strong business model that could help bring your technology to patients.

The Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) for 2018 Summer Cohort of I-Corps at NIH is now available: PA-18-517. More information sessions will be available in early 2018 to help you better understand the program. In the meantime, please refer to the following resources to learn more about the program:

  • FOA: PA-18-517
  • Application due date: March 5, 2018, by 5 PM local time
  • Cohort schedule: June – August 2018
  • Program Information: I-Corps at NIH Program Page
  • Recordings of previous info sessions: Webinar Materials page

If you have any questions about the program, please contact NCI SBIR (ncisbir@mail.nih.gov).

CFB Director Elected Fellow, National Academy of Inventors (NAI)

Clinton Rubin, PhD, Director of the Center for Biotechnology and Distinguished Professor of Biomedical Engineering at Stony Brook University has been elected as a Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI). According to the NAI, election as an NAI Fellow is a high honor bestowed upon academic innovators and inventors who have demonstrated a prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions and innovations that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development, and the welfare of society. Dr. Rubin and fellow SBU Distinguished Professor Dr. Arie Kaufman will be inducted as NAI Fellows during its 2018 national meeting in Washington, DC, on April 5.

With the election of the 2017 class there are now 912 NAI Fellows, representing over 250 research universities and governmental and non-profit research institutes. The 2017 Fellows are named inventors on nearly 6,000 issued U.S. patents, bringing the collective patents held by all NAI Fellows to more than 32,000 issued U.S. patents.

Professor Rubin, founding chair of Stony Brook’s Department of Biomedical Engineering, pioneered research in understanding the role of mechanical signals in the musculoskeletal system and has patented technology that includes use of low frequency mechanical signals (vibrations) to combat disease like osteoporosis and obesity.

More on Dr. Rubin’s election as an NAI Fellow can be access here and here.

CFB Client Secures $3M Public and Private Investment

Codagenix, Inc., a clinical stage, venture and public-sector-funded small business, announced it has secured an additional $3M in funding in support of its live-attenuated Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) vaccine candidate that was developed in collaboration with National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), a part of NIH.

The public funding to Codagenix is via a Phase II SBIR grant for $1.5M to support the pre-clinical manufacturing of the vaccine candidate. The private funding of $1.5M was provided by TopSpin Partners to support a Phase I trial to demonstrate safety and immunogenicity in aged volunteers. The two funding source were not linked; however, both are dedicated to supporting Codagneix’s RSV vaccine through a Phase I trial. Clinical Trial material of Codagenix RSV Vaccine candidate is currently being manufactured with a Phase I targeted for Q3- or Q4-2018.

“Codagenix is an incredible example of a company rooting in our expanding bioecosystem, growing from a startup out of Stony Brook University into a clinical stage company” stated Dr. Clinton Rubin, Director of the New York State Center for Biotechnology at Stony Brook University. “The Center for Biotechnology is proud to provide ongoing support for the work they are doing through our various programs including the Applied Research and Development awards and the Long Island Bioscience Hub funding initiatives.

“We are wrapping up a Phase I with our live-attenuated Influenza Vaccine in Q1-2018 and are very much looking forward to adding a second clinical-stage compound to our pipeline with RSV,” stated Codegenix COO J. Robert Coleman. “We are grateful to our investors and partners like the Center for Biotechnology that understand our vision and continually support our development at these early stages. We are demonstrating that our platform provides a rational means to design vaccines against a range targets – yielding candidates suitable for full clinical development.”

Codagenix has raised a total of $10M since 2015 – with its influenza vaccine candidate currently in Phase I and a pre-clinical pipeline that includes Zika, Dengue, and Agricultural targets in addition to RSV.

RSV is a virus that targets newborns and the elderly, with an estimated market size of $2 Billion for a potential RSV vaccine.

About Codagenix Inc.
Codagenix Inc., a biotechnology company on Long Island, New York, is developing live attenuated vaccines using a “disruptive” software-based rational design algorithm that is unlike previous vaccine “platforms”. By leveraging the redundancy in the genetic code (various codons exist at the gene level to encode the same amino acid at the protein level), the Codagenix algorithm re-structures viral genomes into a sub-optimal genetic code. The so-called “deoptimized” viruses have resulted in highly attenuated vaccine strains that are effective at greatly reduced doses, because they present every antigen of the pathogen, while being 100% identical to the target pathogen at the protein level. The Codagenix pipeline of vaccines includes Influenza, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), Zika, Dengue, foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), pathogenic E. coli, and other pathogens.

Codagenix has also been supported the Center for Biotechnology at Stony brook University which is a New York State Center for Advanced Technology and NIH-designated Research, Evaluation and Commercialization Hub (REACH)

Traverse Biosciences Accepted into NIH Commercialization Accelerator Program (CAP)

Traverse Biosciences, lead by CFB BioEntrepreneur-in-Residence (B-EIR) Joseph Scaduto, has announced that the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has accepted the company into its competitive Commercialization Accelerator Program (CAP).

Hosted in partnership with the Larta Institute, NIH CAP is a 9-month program that is well-regarded for its combination of deep domain expertise and access to industry connections, which have resulted in measurable gains and accomplishments by participating companies. It is open only to NIH SBIR/STTR Phase II awardees, with only 80 slots available each year. The program enables participants to establish market and customer relevance, build commercial relationships, and focus on revenue opportunities available to them.

Last year, Traverse Biosciences announced that it had received a $1.3M Phase II Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) award in partnership with the School of Dental Medicine at Stony Brook University. Read the full Traverse Biosciences announcement here.